Teaching

This page provides a brief description of each course I’ve taught or TAed for. I’ve also included a link to the full student evaluation summary for each course. These anonymous evaluations are conducted by NYU at the end of each semester and, though highly encouraged, are completely voluntary for the students. The results of these evaluations are not shared with instructors until after grades have been submitted.


Primary instructor role:

  • Language, Summer 2019
    • I co-taught this course with graduate student Sora Lin
    • Course description: Language is a social phenomenon, but languages share elaborate and specific structural properties. Speech communities exist, exhibit variation, and change within the confines of universal grammar. Universal grammar is discovered through the careful study of the structures of individual languages, by cross-linguistic investigations, and the investigation of the brain. Introduces fundamental properties of the sound system and of the structure and interpretation of words and sentences against this larger context.
    • Student evaluations here

Teaching assistant role:

  • Language and Mind, Fall 2018
    • Teaching assistant to Prof. Ailís Cournane and Prof. Brian McElree
    • Course description: Introduces students to the field of cognitive science through an examination of language behavior. Begins with interactive discussions of how best to characterize and study the mind. These principles are then illustrated through an examination of research and theories related to language representation and use. Draws from research in both formal linguistics and psycholinguistics.
    • Student evaluations here
  • Language, Spring 2019
    • Teaching assistant to Prof. Lucas Champollion
    • Course description: Language is a social phenomenon, but languages share elaborate and specific structural properties. Speech communities exist, exhibit variation, and change within the strict confines of universal grammar, part of our biological endowment. Universal grammar is discovered through the careful study of the structures of individual languages, by cross-linguistic investigations, and the investigation of the brain. Introduces fundamental properties of the sound system and of the structure and interpretation of words and sentences against this larger context.
    • Student evaluations here
  • Patterns in Language, Fall 2019
    • Teaching assistant to Prof. Lucas Champollion
    • Course description: Can machines think? Do patterns in online searches predict the spread of the flu? Did Shakespeare really write that sonnet? Scientists use patterns in language to answer these questions, using the same concepts that underlie search engines, automatic translators, speech recognition, spell-checkers, and auto-correction tools. Focuses on the technological and linguistic ideas behind these applications and offers hands-on experience and insight into how they work. No programming experience required.
    • Student evaluations here

Grader role (no direct instruction, but available to students through email and office hours)

  • Morphology, Spring 2020
    • Teaching assistant to Prof. Maria Gouskova